Oodi Art Project: AI and Other Intelligences

As part of our curatorial project on Library’s Other Intelligences we received an exclusive sneak preview of the new Helsinki Central Library, Oodi. With Shannon Mattern, Ilari Laamanen (Finnish Cultural Institute New York) and our artists we were able to see how the insides are shaping up. The aesthetically and architecturally stunning building is also such an interesting cluster of spaces that one could write about them much more extensively than just a this short posting. That longer piece might follow later, but already now I personally was struck how they deal with media in its multiple forms from analog to digital, from projection to making. From a cinema theatre equipped with also 35 and 70 mm projecting opportunities to a bespoke space for an analog synthesiser, the library offers an amazing platform for a public engagement with media which also includes recording studio space and a maker space – and yes, even a kitchen. The library is catered as a space of media transformations. At the moment the building exposed its multiple wires, cables, ducts and work – the labour of construction as well as cleaning that is already going on for the launch in December.DSC_1800.JPG

 

The top floor is reserved for what one would imagine as the “traditional” library, a space for books and reading, which also opens up to a terrace overlooking the Finnish parliament building. The roof wave is pretty stunning.

DSC_1828 (1).JPG

DSC_1822.JPG

I wanted to include some of the visual impressions from the space that shows its infrastructure being built up,  a theme that is present in some of the works from the artists Samir Bhowmik, Jenna Sutela and Tuomas A. Laitinen. In general, a key theme of our project concerns architectures and infrastructures of intelligence – both engaging with AI but as an expanded set of intelligences from architectural intelligence to ambient intelligence, from acoustics to amoebas and others layers of an ecology of a library that is a life support system – biologically, intellectually and culturally. It’s these multiple AIs that define the generative forms of languages, materials, and new publics that are present in how we want the space to be perceived. The exhibition opens in January 2019. Updates on social media will use the hashtag #OodiIntel.

DSC_1794.JPG

DSC_1804 (1).JPG

DSC_1808.JPG

Advertisements

MUU/Other

May 28, 2018 2 comments

I am very excited to announce that I have been awarded Honorary membership of the MUU media artists’ association (Finland). Celebrating its 30th anniversary, MUU (Finnish for “other”) has become renowned for its pioneering work in supporting media and experimental arts in Finland. Needless to say, it is a big honour for me to be included in their roster of honorary members. Here’s the picture of my head receiving the award today.

20180528_205538

 

Categories: Finland, Helsinki, media art

The Library’s Other Intelligences

May 26, 2018 1 comment

We are happy to publicly announce our art and curatorial project The Library’s Other Intelligences! Together with Shannon Mattern we are curating a show in Helsinki that includes three inspiring artists Jenna Sutela, Tuomas Laitinen and Samir Bhowmik who all engage in their work with the ecologies intelligence – artificial, artistic, ambient, architectural – that define the library as a cultural institution of knowledge. A key aspect of the project is that it is set as part of the new Helsinki Central Library Oodi – opening its doors in December.

The show opens in January and you can read more information here and if in Helsinki next week, please attend our event Alternative AI’s!

The project is realized through the Mobius Fellowship program of the Finnish Cultural Institute New York (and with the collaboration of Ilari Laamanen).

French Interview: “Écrire autrement l’histoire des médias “

April 21, 2018 Leave a comment

A new interview with me in French is out now in the (exciting) online magazine AOC. With the writer, journalist Sylvain Bourmeau we had a pleasant conversation about media archaeology, contemporary culture and theory, my earlier books and the new French translation of What is Media Archaeology – Qu’est-ce que l’archéologie des médias?

Encore mystérieux pour beaucoup, l’archéologie des médias s’avère un nouveau champ de recherche passionnant, au croisement de nombreuses disciplines et méthodes, qui vise à écrire une histoire alternative des medias au sens le plus large du terme. Alors qu’il est enfin traduit en français, Jussi Parikka, l’un de ses représentants les plus éminents, a accordé un entretien à AOC.
_
Né et formé d’abord en Finlande, professeur de culture technologique et d’esthétique à la Winchester School of Art de l’Université de Southampton, Jussi Parikka est l’un des principaux chercheurs d’un courant transdisciplinaire relativement récent des sciences humaines et sociales : l’archéologie des médias. Parmi son œuvre, riche de plusieurs livres marquants, Qu’est-ce que l’archéologie des médias ? qui vient de paraître en français, nous offre l’occasion d’un entretien.

Read the full interview hereAOC is free but requires to create an account (which is easy).

Surface Prediction

April 14, 2018 1 comment

I am giving a talk in Paris at the École Normale Supérieure and using it as an opportunity to present some new work. This writing stems from some collaborative work with artist Abelardo Gil-Fournier with whom we ran a collective workshop at transmediale on Surface Value . The practice-led workshop was set in the context of our larger discussion on surfaces, media and forms of valuation that pertain both to military and civilian spheres of images (such as aerial imaging) and continuing it in relation to contemporary forms of machine learning and neural networks that take their data from geographical datasets. Hence we are working on this question of prediction as it pertains to geographical and geological surfaces and how these forms of images (from time-lapse to prediction) present a special case for both financial uses of such predictive services and also their experimental angle as forms of moving image – experimental “video” art on a large scale.

Here’s a further excerpt from the talk that also draws on work by Giuliana Bruno, Lisa Parks, Caren Kaplan, Ryan Bishop and many others:

What I want to extract from this research platform that Gil-Fournier’s work offers are some speculative thoughts. At the basis of this is the idea that we can experiment with the correlation of an “imaged” past (the satellite time-lapses) with a machine generated “imaged” future and to test how futures work; how do predicted images compare against the historical datasets and time-lapses and present their own sort of a video of temporal landscapes meant to run just a bit ahead of its time. Naturally would easily risk naturalising things that are radically contingent: mining operations, capital investments, urban growth and financial valuations, geopolitical events, and such. But instead of proposing this as naturalisation, it works to expose some of the techniques through which landscapes are flattened into such a surface of not only inscription of data, but also images in movement. Here,  the speculative is not some sort of a radically distinguished practice that stands out as unique aberration but increasingly the modus operandi and the new normal of things  (Bratton 2016, 2017). What’s interesting is that it spreads out to a variety of fields: the image becomes a speculative one, with interesting implications how we start to think of video; it is also a financial one, as such data-feed mechanisms are also part of what Cubitt describes as one of the forms of geomedia; and it is about landscapes, as they are part of the longer lineage of how we read them as informational signs.

It’s here that the expanded image of a landscape is also embedded in a machine learning environment which also feed as part of financial environments. There are multiple ways how the ecology of images in machine learning works with time – the form of moving image that is the timelapse is also faced with the temporal image of predictions. The technical basis of digital video becomes one reference point for where to start unfolding the other sides of AI as machine learning: this is post-digital culture also in this sense, where not only images of earth surfaces change in view of the data analytics, but the aesthetic contexts of analysis – namely, moving image and video that feed forward (cf. Hansen).

cn-orig-pred

[Image from Abelardo Gil-Fournier’s workshop materials].

Reframing Media: Objects, Sites, Histories in Prague

We are doing this symposium in Prague just before the ICA takes place there the same week. I am in town as a visiting fellow at FAMU for some collaborative work with Tomas Dvorak and others during this visit and some forthcoming ones.

The event is organised in collaboration with the Communication +1 journal.

Reframing Media: Objects, Sites, Histories
May 21, 2018 2PM-530PM
FAMU in Prague
Media studies has opened up new avenues of research across fields, helping to reframe the objects, sites, and histories of scholarly inquiry, providing a way to challenge accepted historical layers of social and technical arrangements. This symposium draws together critical intersections with media, applying postcolonial and feminist theories to contextualize and frame the mediated landscape, both past and present. Drawing from a variety of entangled theories and methodologies, authors engage with a variety of approaches, providing new insights for scholars from an array of backgrounds. This symposium also engages media itself through a media archaeological approach, reframing and interrogating our media so as to shed new understanding to our hyper-mediated world.

Please join us for an engaging symposium.

Reframing Media and Communication
Zachary McDowell, University of Illinois at Chicago

Media Archaeology from Labs to Landscapes
Jussi Parikka, University of Southampton, Winchester School of Art

Hello Machine – Hello Human
Rachel Hanlon, Deakin University, Australia

The Best Sleep of My Life
Laura Forlano, Illinois Institute of Technology

Filmmakers of the World, Unite! Forgotten Internationalism, Czechoslovak Film and the Third World
Tereza Stejskalová, Film and TV School of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague

Schedule

13:30 Arrive
14:00 Zachary McDowell, Introduction – Reframing Media
14:20 Jussi Parikka, Media Archaeology from Labs to Landscapes
15:00 Short Break
15:15 Rachel Hanlon, Hello Machine – Hello Human
15:40 Laura Forlano, The Best Sleep of My Life
16:05 Tereza Stejskalová, Filmmakers of the World, Unite! Forgotten Internationalism, Czechoslovak Film and the Third World
16:30 Discussion
17:30 Adjourn

Preface: Qu’est-ce que l’archéologie des média? 

March 15, 2018 Leave a comment

Emmanuel Guez wrote a nice preface for  Qu’est-ce que l’archéologie des média? , the French translation of What is Media Archaeology?  The preface is now available online here [opens as PDF].

An earlier post about the translation is found here.

Categories: media archaeology