TOKI-town

December 19, 2014 2 comments

Istanbul is most often commented for its stunning beauty in a manner that approaches a modern touristic version of orientalism. For sure it is stunning, but the other side of Istanbul, as real but less visible, is the barbed wire protecting upper middle class & luxury housing areas, security cameras, traffic queues, and TOKIs. Indeed, urban planning and Istanbul is such a rich case study not merely if one is interested in Turkey but global capitalism and megacities in general.

To quote a recent MoMA-exhibition Uneven Growth:

“TOKI development parallels the emergence of a new middle class in Istanbul for whom a TOKI flat is part of a dream of car and house ownership, even if this brings social isolation, long hours in traffic, and long-term debt.”

Screen Shot 2014-12-19 at 7.34.22 PM(Image from Moma/Uneven Growth.)

Categories: architecture, Istanbul

A Post-MECS Interview

December 15, 2014 Leave a comment

I was Senior Fellow last year at MECS at Leuphana University in Germany – here’s one of the things I did there, an interview now online:

The Cover Design for A Geology of Media

December 14, 2014 Leave a comment

After just finishing reading the final proofs for A Geology of Media, I wanted to post the cover design online. The image motif is from the Crystal World project by Kemp, Jordan, and Howse; such an inspiring project that features especially in the book’s chapter III on Psychogeophysics.

image_miniA Geology of Media is out in April 2015 – meanwhile, you might be interested in reading the short “single release”, The Anthrobscene (ebook)!

“All humanity is flying like spacewalking astronauts”

November 30, 2014 Leave a comment

The science-fiction film Interstellar, dir. Christopher Nolan, presents a near-future situation where the human kind seems to be presented with the no-alternative choice of attempting to leave the planet because of the climate change disaster. In George Monbiot’s critical reading, the film presents a political defeatism that boils down to the choice of voting with your feet – with the help of escape velocity. “Technological optimism and political defeatism: this is a formula for the deferment of hard choices to an ever receding netherland of life after planetary death.”

But the trick of the film is rather different. On the one hand, even the idea of leaving is problematised with the (admittably rather odd) relativity theory sort of a twist where the time-axis is bent in ways that actually disturb causality of leaving/returning. On a more social level, the film is more of a Spielbergian tale of the crumbling down of the nuclear family system. But then in terms of biopolitics, one is reminded that perhaps the leaving itself is not that radical departure anyway. It’s already in Michel Serres’ observation, in Natural Contract (1990/1995), that one finds the necessary situation to understand although without a helmet on, we are anyway living as astronauts, governed in relation to atmospheres and biospheres and other ecological conditions of life.

“All humanity is flying like spacewalking astronauts: outside their capsule, but tethered to it by every available network, by the sum of our know-how and of everyone’s money, work, and capacities, so that these astronauts represent the current highly developed human condition.” (120)

Of course, we need to acknowledge that such conditions of living, breathing and other networks are rather differentially distributed on the planet, which returns to us to the more pressing question relating to the political economy of the interstellar imaginary of governance – political but also in the techno-scientific sense cybernetic (with its long term relations to κυβερνώ (kyvernó̱).

Forerunners

November 11, 2014 Leave a comment

As a follow-up to the previous post about the Anthrobscene-publication, you can find the press release for the Forerunners-series here.

In the Press Release, the editor of the series Danielle Kasprzak outlines:

“Forerunners gives authors space to explore idea-driven works that often aren’t taken up by university presses. These pieces are shorter and more speculative than traditional monographs, and we see them reaching a wider, interdisciplinary (even general) audience. Our goal with Forerunners is to combine the value of an academic publisher—peer review, editorial guidance, copyediting, and production—with the timeliness of agile publishing tools. These pieces are out in twelve weeks instead of twelve months, and they’re affordable and accessible.”

image

The Anthropocene to the Anthrobscene

October 31, 2014 3 comments

The Anthrobscene is now out and available as a short e-book in the new University of Minnesota Press series Forerunners. The short book (77 pp) extends on the notion of the deep time of the media (Zielinski) to talk of the geological and electronic waste layers that characterise media technological materiality. It consists of four short sections

1. And the Earth Screamed, Alive
2. An Ecology of Deep Time
3. A Media History of Matter: From Scrap Metal to Zombie Media
4. Conclusion: Cultural Techniques of Material Media

The sections outline  the idea of materialities of media in the context of the Anthropocene – the suggested and widely discussed term for the geological period where the human being has had such a significant effect on the planet to merit a new periodization. But the idea is to extend this to emphasise the obscenities of the environmental damage that works across natural, social and media ecology.

The Anthrobscene is a preview or if you prefer, a single, of the forthcoming longer book A Geology of Media (out next Spring).

anthrobscene cover
The book is one of three that kickstarts the new Forerunners series, “a thought-in-process series of breakthrough digital works written between fresh ideas and finished books” and characterized as “gray literature publishing: where intense thinking, change, and speculation happens in scholarship.” The series is edited at the University of Minnesota Press by Danielle Kasprzak.

The Anthrobscene is available for download directly on the UMP website as well as in your “local” Amazon (Kindle and the slightly more expensive print on demand paperback) and gradually in other e-book stores too, including now already on Barnes & Noble & Kobo. The Amazon-page has a preview of the content.

Ubiq Computing And Smart Cities – a write-up

October 29, 2014 Leave a comment

Here’s a nice short write-up of the Computing the City-event that took place at the Leuphana University in Germany in July. The various papers addressed several analytical, historical and ethical aspects of ubiquitous computing in the context of smart cities. We will be continuing on similar themes in one of the panels we (Winchester School of Art) curated for the forthcoming transmediale-festival.

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