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Geology of Media-news: Choice

January 19, 2016 Leave a comment

2016 started with some nice news for A Geology of Media: Choice-magazine chose it as “an outstanding academic title for 2015” with also a very nice short review of the book.

Also a couple of other reviews  just came out.Prudence Gibson reviewed it for Critical Inquiry; Afterimage-journal ran another review. In addition, Jesper Olsson wrote about the book for Spheres, a newish online journal: “Going Underground – An Expanded Materialism of Media Theory.”

 

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Geology of Media reviews and more

The first reviews of A Geology of Media are out! Some links here if you are interested in the first reception of the book:

Sean Cubitt reviews it in Theory, Culture & Society;

J.R.Carpenter wrote the review Massive Media for Furtherfield.

ArtReview did a short review in their May 2015 issue:

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In addition, Kunstkritikk published an interview with me on the themes and topics of the book!

Geology of Media Launch Events

April 28, 2015 1 comment

unnamedThere will be some launch events/book talks for A Geology of Media especially in the latter part of May. Here’s a brief schedule of different locations, often in connection with an event, sometimes as stand-alone book launch! Below you will find also a Press Release that our University Media Team put together.

13/5, Wednesday, at Winchester School of Art, in the gallery starting at 17.00. Wine will be served, and Professor Sean Cubitt (Goldsmiths, London) will open the event.

15/5, Friday, at Central St. Martins, at 17.30. The book launch is moderated by Dr Betti Marenko and it follows a day-seminar on Technology as Magic. After the short conversation in the Lecture Theater, we will continue to the Platform Bar at CSM. Some drinks are sponsored by University of Minnesota Press!

20/5, Vienna, Austria, at the Natural History Museum at 18.30 in connection with the Rare Earth-exhibition at Thyssen-Bornemisza-gallery. The day is in combination with a tour of the museum and the gallery on the theme of minerals.

21/5, Utrecht, Netherlands at BAK (around 17.30).The book launch follows the day seminar on Anthropocene/Capitalocene (Posthuman Glossary) at BAK.

30/5, Stockholm, Sweden, at the Index-gallery 16.00, an evening of talks with Lori Emerson and the launch of the book.

Other events later this year in Brazil, the US, Canada and possibly some other countries. Details tba and I will update the list.

Press Release

Media history – more geology than technology?

The geological history of media comes under close scrutiny in a new book by Professor Jussi Parikka who contends that media history may be millions, even billions, of years old – especially when you revisit the full story of the raw materials that are used to make the countless media devices we’ve ‘consumed’ for centuries and increasingly rely upon in the 21st century.

In his new book ‘A Geology of Media’ (University of Minnesota Press, ISBN 978-0-8166-9552-2) Parikka, Professor in Technological Culture and Aesthetics at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, argues that to adequately understand contemporary media culture by thinking about media and its past in geological terms, focusing on Earth’s history, geological formations, minerals, and energy. The book is the third part in the media ecology-trilogy following Digital Contagions (2007) and Insect Media (2010), which won the Anne Friedberg Award for Innovative Scholarship in 2012.

Exploring the resource depletion and material resourcing required for us to use our devices to live networked lives in today’s society, Professor Parikka grounds his analysis in Siegfried Zielinski’s widely discussed notion of deep time—but takes it back millennia. He argues that these raw materials are the physical origins of media technology and by understanding their transformation, eventually from useful tool to e-waste, can aid us all in having a better understanding of the implications that media has for society.

Not only are rare earth minerals and many other materials needed to make our digital media machines work, he observes, but used and obsolete media technologies return to the earth as residue of digital culture, contributing to growing layers of toxic waste for future archaeologists to ponder. Professor Parikka shows that these materials must be considered alongside the often dangerous and exploitative labor processes that refine them into the devices underlying our seemingly virtual or immaterial practices.

“One could call this approach a media history of matter: the different components, minerals, metals, chemicals and other things involved in media are considered essential to media history and archaeology,” says Professor Parikka. “Geology and various related disciplines and fields of knowledge such as chemistry and, indeed, ecology, frame the modern world and give it one possible scientific structure.

“Such disciplines are strongly implied in the emergence of the technological and scientific culture which feeds to our media cultural practice,” he continues. “It is in this sense that I am interested in finding strains of media materialism outside the usual definition of media; instead of radio, I prefer to think what components and materials enable such technologies; instead of networking, we need to remember the importance of copper or optical fiber for such forms of communication; instead of a blunt discussion of ‘the digital’, we need to pick it apart and remember that also mineral durations are essential to it being such a crucial feature that penetrates our academic, social and economic interests.”

“A Geology of Media demonstrates that the environment does not just surround our media cultural world—it runs through it, enables it, and hosts it in an era of unprecedented climate change,” Professor Parikka concludes. “While looking backward to Earth’s distant past, it also looks forward to a more expansive media theory—and, implicitly, media activism.”

A Geology of Media – out and available

March 23, 2015 1 comment

So this is a sort of an announcement: I was happy to receive my first copy of A Geology of Media during my visit to UNSW in Sydney.  In other words, the book is now more or less out – a bit ahead of schedule and gradually available in online and offline bookshops, and of course in different e-formats (Kindle, epub, etc) already!

The earlier published little e-booklet The Anthrobscene was a short preview single of this main book that is also now out!

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My talk in Sydney was the first “book talk” after the book is actually out, and it will be followed by several more during the Spring. The talks are primarily in Europe, and some launch celebrations are planned for May in Winchester (at WSA), and also London, Vienna, Utrecht and Stockholm. More details of dates and places to follow.

Please find below the official release text with information on how to obtain a review copy! Please spread the word to people who might be interested and consider asking your university library to order a copy.

A sweeping new ecological take on technology

unnamed
A GEOLOGY OF MEDIA
By Jussi Parikka
University of Minnesota Press l 224 pages l April 2015
ISBN 978-0-8166-9552-2 | paperback | $24.95
ISBN 978-0-8166-9551-5 | hard cover | $87.50
Electronic Mediations, Volume 46

Media history is millions, even billions, of years old.  That is the premise of Jussi Parikka’s pioneering and provocative book, A Geology of Media, which argues that to adequately understand contemporary media culture we must set out from material realities that precede media themselves – Earth’s history, geological formations, minerals, and energy.

PRAISE FOR A GEOLOGY OF MEDIA:
“Jussi Parikka’s A Geology of Media really expands what media theory can do.  The materiality of media is no longer restricted to questions of economies of technics but extends all the way to its molecular composition.  It connects the fast calculations of digital time to the deepest of temporalities, that of the earth itself.  An essential contribution to a media theory for the Anthropocene.”—McKenzie Wark, author of Molecular Red

“A Geology of Media does not complete or close down an area of research, but rather opens one up. This book is vital to any continuing consideration of media today.”

— Steven Shaviro, author of The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Jussi Parikka is professor in technological culture and aesthetics at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton.  He is the author of Insect Media (Minnesota, 2010), Digital Contagions, and What is Media Archaeology?

For more information, including the table of contents, visit the book’s webpage:
http://www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/a-geology-of-media
Electronic Mediations-series.

For review copies or author interview requests, contact:
Heather Skinner, Publicist
University of Minnesota Press
111 3rd Ave S, Ste. 290
Minneapolis, MN 55401-2520
skinn077 — at  — umn.edu
v * 612-627-1932
f * 612-627-1980

The Cover Design for A Geology of Media

December 14, 2014 Leave a comment

After just finishing reading the final proofs for A Geology of Media, I wanted to post the cover design online. The image motif is from the Crystal World project by Kemp, Jordan, and Howse; such an inspiring project that features especially in the book’s chapter III on Psychogeophysics.

image_miniA Geology of Media is out in April 2015 – meanwhile, you might be interested in reading the short “single release”, The Anthrobscene (ebook)!

A Geology of Media

January 17, 2014 6 comments

I am pleased to announce that I have signed a contract with University of Minnesota Press for a new book tentatively called A Geology of Media.

Planned for 2015, A Geology of Media forms the third, final part of the media ecology-trilogy. It started with Digital Contagions: A Media Archaeology of Computer Viruses (2007) and continued with Insect Media (2010). This book on the geophysics and the non-organic ground of media complements the earlier takes by offering a media materialism from the point of view of geological resources, electronic waste and media arts. Through engaging with several contemporary art and technology projects it provides a media theoretical argument: to think of materiality of media beyond the focus on machines and technologies by focusing on what they consist of: the chemistry and geological materials of media, from metals to dust.

In short, I am interested to see if what pejoratively sometimes is called “hardware fetishism” is not hard enough, and even media and cultural theorists need to focus on the rocks and crust that make technical media possible. Earth history of deep times mixes with media history, which becomes a matter of not only thousands, but millions of years of non-linear history (to modify Manuel Delanda’s original idea). This way media materialism becomes a way to entangle media technologies, environmental issues and themes of global labour. Perhaps instead of the Anthropocene, we should just refer to the Anthropobscene.

I’ve been in recent talks and short posts been addressing the geological in media, and my piece in The Atlantic offered a short preview of what’s to come. In addition, below a very tentative table of contents.   This project (and the Erkki Kurenniemi book I am working on with Joasia Krysa) will keep me busy for a while.

A Geology of Media

Preface

1) Introduction: Grounds of Media/Culture

2) An Alternative Deep Time of the Media

3) Psychogeophysics of Technology

4) Dust and the Exhausted Planet

5) Media Fossils

Afterwords: Half-Life

Appendix:

“Zombie Media”, by Garnet Hertz and Jussi Parikka

From the Crystal World-project (Howse, Jordan, Kemp)

From the Crystal World-project (Howse, Jordan, Kemp)

Deep Times and Geology of Media

August 20, 2013 Leave a comment

“Yes I will” – “No, it is not something worthwhile”.

I’ve been going back and forth for a while whether I will try to expand my ideas concerning “geology of media” into some sort of a book or not. Without having reached a conclusion, I have however been giving talks on the topic the past times. Here is one – as video – from Bochum from the very good General Ecology-event Erich Horl organised.

Media Theory with the Terraformers

A new interview is out in the Strelka Mag. We conducted this discussion with Yulia Gromova in Moscow during my teaching gig at Strelka’s The Terraforming program in February. The interview also briefly touches on my brief that we executed with the program researchers: we inaugurated a new synthetic discipline called A Natural History of Logistics and related to the body of work in media theory, architecture, urbanism, etc. The idea was to tease out various historical and contemporary – actual and speculative – points of connections between systems often deemed “natural” and “technological” so as to problematise the division into the two, and also to understand the various affordances so-called natural systems have in relation to questions of infrastructure and logistics. This also then facilitated looking at the various material frictions in logistical systems in relation to territories, environmental concerns, political questions, etc. The results presented by the Strelka researchers of the Terraforming cohort 2019-2020  – from architects to designers to artists etc. – were really inspiring and impressive.

The interview in Strelka Mag also speaks of some other work, including on Geology of Media etc.

Geologie médií

March 22, 2020 Leave a comment

The Czech translation of A Geology of Media is now out and available with Karolinum publishing house (Prague) as Geologie médiíAlso the Czech translation of What is Media Archaeology? is forthcoming (probably 2021) as well as a book focusing on my work (planned to be out in 2021).

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The Anthrobscene in Portuguese

November 14, 2017 Leave a comment

The short booklet the Anthrobscene has been translated into Portuguese in Brazil. The essay that  was a sort of a single release of the later A Geology of Media now features as part of the Open Access collection Configurações do pós-digital: arte e cultura tecnológicas, edited by​ Pablo Gobira & Tadeus Mucelli. The book’s foreword is written by Lucia Santaella.

With the new translation, I was also again left thinking  the title, the neologism it carries. Besides the obvious Baudrillard-connotation that was not supposed to be the main thrust of the term, an alternative link that I was reminded about today comes through Ian Sinclair’s discussion of the fringes of London as obscenery instead of scenery. In Esther Leslie’s description, Sinclair’s obscenery is somewhat rather apt concerning also the Anthrobscene picking up on the wastelandscape imageries: “..contained in that word [obscenery] is the sense of being off-scene, off the stage, out of sight and out of mind. Sinclair describes places of no memory, forgotten places, places where memory is expunged in waves of rebuilding, re-destroying, places of transit, places, such as the London Orbital motorway, the M25, designed to pass through and keep moving.” (Leslie, in Synthetic Worlds.)

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You can download the book here.

Recently another Brazilian collection included some of my writing (as well as other translations and texts by Brazilian colleagues) on media archaeology. You can find more information about A(na)rqueologias das Mídias online.

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