A Fellowship at MECS

I am pretty happy about spending some time in Germany over the summer– and not just any trip, but as Senior Fellow at the Leuphana University Media Cultures of Computer Simulation-centre (MECS). MECS is one of the exciting developments at Leuphana (in Lüneburg) and in Germany, collecting some of the most interesting media theorists, analysts and historians. Led by Claus Pias and Martin Warnke, MECS’s project description tells the story of mutually informing investigations of media culture and science. Indeed, MECS presents itself as part of analysis of changes in scientific methods but also rather fundamental questions as to the nature of scientific knowledge itself. Furthermore, digital media becomes an agent in this transformation. “Digital media develops a medial obstinacy; it generates and at the same time processes problems which in the past were often inaccessible, either by analysis or experimentation.”

MECS’s annual themes for the coming years are found here – for this year, the focus is on Wissen referring to knowledge and the media epistemology of computer simulations, followed next year by Rechnen: to calculate/calculation.

In this context my own project focuses on the double bind of the media epistemological (e.g. sensors) and the environmental questions (such as smog) in a theoretical context of media materialism. I have been interested in how to expand media materialism to a wider set of material questions that include media ecology and the environmental too, partly in the context of Geology of Media. I also need to write a couple of commissioned articles on Friedrich Kittler during the summer. In addition, with Paul Feigelfeld we will edit a short e-issue focusing on Kittler for Theory, Culture & Society.

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Designing Techno-Political Realities and Imaginaries

We at the Winchester School of Art (#WSA) are hosting this lovely little event – with quite the trio: Benjamin Bratton, Jordan Crandall and Ed Keller are coming to Winchester for meetings and agreed to give a joint panel on Design, Biopolitics and Contemporary Technological Realities – and imaginaries we might want to add.

More info here, and below their titles for the short interventions in the panel:

Benjamin H. Bratton: “On Platform-Based on Robotics”

Jordan Crandall: “The Materiality of Drones”

Ed Keller: “Shadow Ecologies, An Alternate Biopolitical History”

Recursions: a new book series in media & cultural theory

April 30, 2014 5 comments

recursions logoWe are proud to announce the launch of a new book series titled Recursions: Theories of Media, Materiality and Cultural Techniques. Placed with Amsterdam University Press, a publisher known for its strong track-record in film and media studies, the series will publish fresh, exciting and important books in media theory. This includes both translations and other volumes that address the core themes outlined below. I am very excited about this project and working with my co-editors Anna Tuschling and Geoffrey Winthrop-Young. We have already some significant projects lined up for 2015 and more forthcoming that we will announce in the coming weeks and months. We are supported by a very strong international advisory board. Get in touch if you want to learn more but first read below for more information!

New Series Announcement

The new book series Recursions: Theories of Media, Materiality, and Cultural Techniques provides a platform for cutting- edge research in the field of media culture studies with a particular focus on the cultural impact of media technology and the materialities of communication. The series aims to be an internationally significant and exciting opening into emerging ideas in media theory ranging from media materialism and hardware-oriented studies to ecology, the post-human, the study of cultural techniques, and recent contributions to media archaeology.

The series revolves around key themes:

  • The material underpinning of media theory
  • New advances in media archaeology and media philosophy
  • Studies in cultural techniques

These themes resonate with some of the most interesting debates in international media studies, where non-representational thought, the technicity of knowledge formations and new materialities expressed through biological and technological developments are changing the vocabularies of cultural theory. The series is also interested in the mediatic conditions of such theoretical ideas and developing them as media theory.

Forthcoming 2015

  • Sybille Krämer – Medium, Messenger, Transmission: An Approach to Media Philosophy.
  • Claus Pias – Computer Game Worlds.

Editorial Board

Advisory Board:

  • Wendy Hui Kyong Chun (Brown University, US)
  • Geert Lovink (Hogeschool van Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
  • John Durham Peters (University of Iowa, US)
  • Thomas Y. Levin (Princeton University, US)
  • Marie-Luise Angerer (University of Arts Cologne, Germany)
  • Eva Horn (University of Vienna, Austria)
  • Markus Krajewski (University of Basel, Switzerland)
  • Erick Felinto (State University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
  • Adalberto Müller (Federal University of Niterói, UFF, Rio de Janeiro)
  • Eivind Røssaak (National Library of Norway)
  • Steven Connor (Cambridge University, UK)
  • Peter Krapp (UC Irvine, US)
  • Antje Pfannkuchen (Dickinson College, PA, US)
  • John Armitage (Winchester School of Art, UK)
  • Till Heilmann (University of Siegen, Germany)
  • Isabell Otto (University of Konstanz, Germany)
  • Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky (University of Bochum, Germany)
  • Sean Cubitt (Goldsmiths College, London, UK)
  • Claus Pias (Leuphana University, Germany)
  • Stefan Rieger (University of Bochum, Germany)
  • Andrew Murphie (University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia)
  • Axel Fliethmann (Monash University, Melbourne, Australia)
  • Yuji Nawata (Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan)

aup logo

Authors’ information

Proposals welcomed

Proposals for monographs or edited volumes should kindly follow the standard AUP Proposal Form (http://en.aup.nl/en/service/authors) and should also include the envisaged table of contents, an overview of the volume and abstracts of the proposed chapters or articles.

Further information

If you are interested in publishing a book with us please contact Jeroen Sondervan, Senior Commissioning Editor for Film & Media Studies at j.sondervan@aup.nl or one of the series editors.

More information about Amsterdam University Press.

 

Insect Media: Introduction

April 29, 2014 1 comment

I’ve uploaded  the Introduction-chapter of Insect Media online on Academia.edu! More info on the book, as before, on University of Minnesota Press website. If you want a quick glimpse into the arguments of the book, some reviews online include Jacob Gaboury’s in Rhizome and Jennifer Gabrys’ in Mute.

A short blog post on “What is Insect Media?” gives a  condensed glimpse into some of the themes. For a more popular take, see what Wired wrote about the book.

insect media cover

The Warhol Forensics

April 27, 2014 6 comments

The news about the (re)discovered Andy Warhol-images, excavated by digital forensics means, has been making rounds in news and social media. In short, a team of experts – including Cory Arcangel – discovered Warhol’s Amiga-paintings from 1985 floppy discs. As described in the news story: “

“Warhol’s Amiga experiments were the products of a commission by Commodore International to demonstrate the graphic arts capabilities of the Amiga 1000 personal computer. Created by Warhol on prototype Amiga hardware in his unmistakable visual style, the recovered images reveal an early exploration of the visual potential of software imaging tools, and show new ways in which the preeminent American artist of the 20th century was years ahead of his time.” The images are related to the famous Debbie Harry-image Warhol painted on Amiga.

The case is an interesting variation on themes of media art history as well as digital forensics. As Julian Oliver coined it in a tweet:

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The media archaeological enters with a realisation of the importance of such methods for the cultural heritage of born-digital content, but there’s more. The non-narrative focus of such methodologies is a different way of accessing what could be thought of as media archaeology of software culture and graphics. The technological tools carry an epistemological, even ontological weight: we see things differently; we are able to access a world previously unseen, also in historical contexts.

But there is  a pull towards traditional historical discourses. The project demonstrates a technical understanding of cultural heritage and contemporary software culture but rhetorically frames it as just another part of the art historical/archaeological mythology of rediscovering long lost masterpieces of a Genius. This side still needs some updating so that the technical episteme of the excavation, detailed here [PDF] can become fully realised. Techniques of reverse engineering as well as insights into image formats as ways to understand the technical image need to be matched up with discourse that is able to demonstrate something more than traditional art history by new means. It needs to be able to show what is already at stake in these methods: a historical mapping of the anonymous forces of history, to use words from S. Giedion.

Scholars such as Matt Kirschenbaum have already demonstrated the significant stakes of digital forensics as part of a radical mindset to historical scholarship, heritage and media theory and we need to be able to build on such work that is theoretically rich.

 

 

Medya Jeolojisi

April 17, 2014 Leave a comment

Medya Jeolojisi“, a Turkish translation of my “Geology of Media”-piece is now available on Birikim online. A big thanks to translators Ezgi Akdağ & Aycan Katıtaş! The short text offers an alternative account of media materiality, and it was originally published in The Atlantic. (Also a Swedish translation is expected).

The short piece is a good teaser trailer to the forthcoming book(s): The Anthrobscene (forthcoming 2014) and Geology of Media (expected Spring 2015).

Code and Labour

April 16, 2014 Leave a comment

The new issue of Cultural Studies Review follows up from the 2012 Code-conference that was held in Melbourne, at Swinburne University. The event  was marvelous, thanks to the organizers. And now, Esther Milne and Anthony McCosker have edited a lovely special issues Coding Labour. With a line-up including Anna Munster, Ned Rossiter, Mark Cote,Rowan Wilken and many more – as well as for instance Meaghan Morris in the same issue – one can expect much.

My own article is about the slightly heretic crossbreeding of German media theory and cognitive capitalism. It briefly discusses the notion of cultural techniques as a way to elaborate cognitive capitalism in the context of practices and techniques of software, code and labour. Hence it ends up in a curious short example from the 1970s, the management and organisational arrangement of metaprogramming, as a way to discuss how we might approach techniques of “creative” work in software culture.

You can find the text here and below a short abstract.

This article addresses cultural techniques of cognitive capitalism. The author argues that to understand the full implications of the notion of cognitive capitalism we need to address the media and cultural techniques which conditions its range and applications. The article offers an expanded understanding of the labour of code and programming through a case study of ‘metaprogramming’, a software related organisation practice that offered a way to think of software creativity and programming in organisations. The ideas from the 1970s that are discussed offer a different way to approach creativity and collaborative and post-Fordist capitalism. The author brings together different theoretical perspectives, including German media theory and Yann Moulier Boutang’s thesis about cognitive capitalism. The wider argument is that we should pay more attention to the media archaeological conditions of practices of labour and value appropriation of contemporary technological capitalism as well as the cultural techniques which include ‘ontological and aesthetic operations’ that produce cultural, material situations.

 

 

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